Limited Liability Company & Corp. 15+ Great Tax Benefits

In this article, we will discuss few great tax benefits of forming an LLC or Corporation

What Are the Tax Advantages of forming a Limited Liability Company (LLC)?


A Limited Liability Company or LLC has various tax advantages, including the ability to determine how the entity is taxed.


Taxes should be one of your top priorities when deciding on a business structure. If you’re thinking about forming a limited liability company (LLC), keep in mind that the IRS doesn’t have a particular tax classification for them. This allows you to decide how your Limited Liability Company (LLC) will be taxed.


A limited liability company (LLC) can be taxed in four different ways:


• as a sole proprietorship • as a partnership • as a corporation (C corp) or (S corp)


You can elect to be taxed as a sole proprietorship, partnership, or C corporation if you run a single-member limited liability company (LLC). A sole proprietorship isn’t a possibility if your limited liability company(LLC) includes more than one owner; however, the other three are.


Here are some things to think about when deciding how your limited liability company (LLC) should be taxed.


The cost of living. Consider whether IRS treatment as a “disregarded entity” or as a corporation would be beneficial for your limited liability company’s tax status.

For tax purposes, a disregarded entity is treated the same as a sole proprietorship. In that instance, the profits from your limited liability company’s are taxed as personal income.

Your tax return is simplified thanks to “pass-through taxation.” If you choose corporation status, on the other hand, your income is taxed at a lower corporate rate up to a specified limit set by the IRS.


Deductions for capital expenses For acquisitions of products or equipment that the business will use over a one-year period, limited liability company’s can deduct capital expenditures. According to IRS rules, the deduction is divided up throughout the year.


Operating costs. On their personal tax returns, limited liability company members can deduct genuine business expenses, including the cost of forming the limited liability company.

Profits and deductions are divided among owners based on their percentage ownership.

It’s worth noting that a C corp may be a preferable alternative for some employee benefits, such as medical, disability, and life insurance, as the benefits would otherwise be taxed to limited liability company members.

In addition, limited liability company owners may be eligible for the Qualified Business Income Deduction, which allows them to deduct 20% of their business net income in addition to business expense deductions.


Taxation in two ways The corporation and its shareholders are both taxed on their earnings, resulting in double taxation. A corporation is also required to pay corporate taxes. Unless the entity is structured as a corporation for tax purposes, a Limited Liability Company can help you avoid double taxation.

For most small business owners, forming a limited liability company provides the most flexibility in selecting how the business is taxed, as well as the restricted liability of a corporation with less formality. Because each Limited Liability Company is different, you should seek legal or financial counsel from your lawyers or a CPA before deciding on tax status.

When Should a Sole Proprietorship Transition to a Limited Liability Company (LLC)?


It is ultimately up to you to make the decision. However, keep in mind that, as a startup, legal protection might be critical to your well-being and the success of your business.

Forming a limited liability company (LLC) early on can assist protect you from personal liability in your business. It can also make your business a more stable image to lenders, vendors, customers, and business partners. In that respect, it can be viewed as a financial investment in your long-term success.


Running a sole proprietorship is as easy as showing up for work and keeping account of your earnings. Because you own the company and are the owner, all decisions must be made by you. It’s simple to get started, but as your business expands, you’ll have to take on more risks and you have to set up a separate legal entity.

What is an S corporation, and how does it differ from a traditional corporation?

The tax advantages that an S corporation provides are its most distinguishing feature. It’s termed an S corporation because it’s chosen to be taxed under Subchapter S of the Internal Revenue Code, thereby making it a “pass-through” entity.

Otherwise, it’s a for-profit corporation formed under the same state corporation rules as a C corporation and managed by them (or a corporation that was not eligible for S corporation tax status or whose shareholders chose not to elect that status).


In advantages of liability protection, ownership, and management, an S corporation is identical to a C corporation.

The Biggest advantage of S Corporation over C Corporation is avoidance of Double Taxation.


What are the advantages of forming an S corporation?


An S corporation’s advantages frequently surpass any apparent downsides. When it comes to transferring ownership or closing down a business, the S corporation structure can be extremely advantageous.

Sole proprietorships and general partnerships often do not have access to these advantages. Among the advantages of an S corporation are:


o Taxation at the source. At the corporate level, an S corporation pays no federal taxes. (The federal rules are followed by most states, but not all.) To see if your state recognizes the federal S corporation election, visit the Ongoing Corporation

Requirements page of our state guides.) Any profit or loss made by the company is “passed through” to the shareholders, who declare it on their personal tax returns.

This means that business losses can be used to balance other income on the tax returns of shareholders, lowering the amount of income tax owed. In the early stages of a new business, this can be highly beneficial.

(A company that does not elect S corporation classification but earns passive income may be classed as a personal holding company.)

o Assets that have been safeguarded The personal assets of its shareholders are safeguarded by an S corporation.

A shareholder is not personally liable for the corporation’s business debts and liabilities unless there is an express personal guarantee.

Creditors cannot go after the stockholders’ personal assets (houses, bank accounts, etc.) to pay off business obligations. Owners and the business are treated as one in a sole proprietorship or general partnership, leaving personal assets insecure.

o Greater trustworthiness Because the owners have made a formal commitment to their business, operating as an S corporation may assist a fledgling business build credibility with potential customers, employees, vendors, and partners.

O Income is classified in a tax-advantageous way. S corporation shareholders can work for the company and be paid as employees. They can also earn tax-free dividends and other distributions from the corporation, up to the extent of their investment.

While still earning business-expense and wages-paid deductions for the corporation, proper classification of distributions as salary or dividends can help the owner-operator decrease the self-employment tax burden.


O Accounting using the cash method. The accrual method of accounting is required for all corporations unless they are deemed to be small corporations by the IRS.

(A small corporation is defined as one with gross receipts of less than $5,000,000.) S corporations, on the other hand, are generally exempt from using the accrual method unless they have inventory.


O The transfer of ownership is straightforward. Interests in an S corporation can be freely transferred without triggering any negative tax consequences for the transferor.

For partnerships and limited liability companies, the transfer of more than a 50% interest in the entity can cause it to be wound up and dissolve.

When an ownership interest is transferred, the S corporation does not have to make any adjustments to the property basis or comply with any complicated accounting rules.

They are subject to fewer ownership restrictions than S corporations.


Numerous rules govern the ownership of S corporations, including the limitation of the number of shareholders to 100, the prohibition against non-resident alien shareholders, and the prohibition against non-individual shareholders (with a few exceptions).

Additionally, they are not permitted to issue more than one class of stock. When entrepreneurs are looking for equity investors, these restrictions may make it difficult for them to get what they want.

What Is C-Corporation?

When it comes to C- corporations, the C corporation (also known as the C-corp) is a legal structure where the owners, or shareholders, are taxed separately from the corporation. Profits from a business are subject to taxation at both the corporate and personal levels, resulting in a situation of double taxation.

However, it also allows for more deductions at the same time. The most important metric, in this case, is Total Expenses.

Tax Advantages of Forming a C-Corporation

When starting a new small business, one of the most important decisions that entrepreneurs must make is selecting the most appropriate business structure.

Many small businesses begin as sole proprietorships or partnerships, but entrepreneurs may choose to incorporate their businesses in order to protect their personal assets from company liabilities, including lawsuits and debt.

When they get to that point, they are confronted with a veritable alphabet soup of options: limited liability company‘s, S corporations, and C corporations. How do you determine which option is the best fit for your company?


With the implementation of the 2018 tax reform changes, C corporations have emerged as the clear winner among other business entities.


Pass-Through Business Entities (also known as pass-through corporations): How are sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited liability companies, and S corporations taxed?


When it comes to tax, the most obvious distinctions between business structures become apparent. S corporations, limited liability companies, and sole proprietorships account for the vast majority of small businesses in the United States that operate as pass-through entities.

In other words, their profits are “passed through” to the owners and shareholders, who then report business income or losses on their personal income tax returns.

Pass-through entities are exempt from the payment of corporate income taxes.


According to the 2018 tax reform, these entities may be eligible for a deduction of up to 20 percent on their taxable income from pass-through taxes.

If a small business earns $100,000 in income that will be passed through to its owners, only $80,000 of that income will be taxable under the new tax law, according to an example.

However, there is a slew of tax benefits available to C corporations that can help to reduce or even eliminate the possibility of double taxation.

Furthermore, as a result of the new tax reform, which significantly reduces the tax burden on C corporations, astute business owners are rethinking their corporate structure to maximize their profits.

As a result, even income that is passed through to individual shareholders will be taxed at a lower rate as a result of the reduction in the majority of individual tax brackets. When taken together, this means that filing your business as a pass-through entity may no longer provide a significant tax advantage.

limited liability company

Few Other Benefits of Forming a C-Corporation


Aside from the lower corporate tax rate, there are a variety of other reasons why entrepreneurs should benefit from forming a C corp.

Even though there is the possibility of double taxation, this business structure can actually assist entrepreneurs in lowering their overall tax liability.

In addition to numerous tax write-offs and advantages in attracting future financing, this traditional structure can be a tremendously useful tool for shifting income for tax purposes.

In fact, the C corporation structure is used by a large number of businesses, regardless of their size. Here are ten compelling arguments in favor of incorporating as a C corporation:

The practice of carrying profits and losses forward and backward in time.


Unlike limited liability companies and S corporations, which must have their fiscal year coincide with the calendar year, C corporations have greater flexibility in determining their fiscal year.

As a result, shareholders can more easily shift income, deciding which year to pay taxes on bonuses and which year to take losses, which can significantly reduce their tax liabilities.

Encouraging the participation of passive investors.
One of the most widely praised advantages of S corporations is their ability to pass losses through to individual tax returns.

This, however, only applies to partners who are actively involved in the management of the corporation as a result of their partnership. As a result, passive investors tend to benefit from C corporations in terms of taxation.

Deducting charitable contributions from income.


Contributions to eligible charities (of no more than 10% of taxable income in any given year) can be deducted as a business expense only if they are made by a C corporation.

You can also carry over charitable contributions in excess of the limit to the following five tax years.
Obtaining financing and going public are the tenth and final steps.


Business structures with flexible ownership, such as C corporations, are preferred by venture capitalists, and certain types of small business financing, such as 401(k) business financing, are only available to C corporations (see below).

A small business enterprise may grow into a very large one, large enough to attract funding as a publicly traded company on a national stock exchange, in which case it must be organized as a C corp as well.

Deducting salaries and bonuses from earnings.
Shareholders in C corporations have the ability to work as salaried employees.

The corporation can deduct its entire share of payroll taxes, even though these salaries and bonuses are subject to payroll taxes, Social Security and Medicare contributions, and other obligations.

The company can also pay employees sufficiently so that no taxable profits remain at the end of the fiscal year if this is possible Shareholders frequently elect to exercise this option rather than receiving dividends, which would be subject to double taxation.

They are subject to fewer ownership restrictions than S corporations.

Numerous rules govern the ownership of S corporations, including the limitation of the number of shareholders to 100, the prohibition against non-resident alien shareholders, and the prohibition against non-individual shareholders (with a few exceptions).

Additionally, they are not permitted to issue more than one class of stock. When entrepreneurs are looking for equity investors, these restrictions may make it difficult for them to get what they want.

Keeping your overall tax burden to a minimum.

In addition to what was previously stated, the 2018 tax reform bill was a significant victory for corporations. In the case of business owners who only receive a salary, the amount taxed is not subject to corporate taxation, further taking the tax equation in their favor.

When it comes to new or small businesses, not taking a dividend often makes sense because the money is being re-invested into the company’s growth operations.

Carrying losses over a period of several years.

This business structure is capable of sustaining significant capital and operating losses, and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) does not scrutinize businesses, particularly new ones, that have sustained losses for a number of years.

This is particularly important for start-up businesses that may incur significant losses in their first year but wish to carry those losses forward to succeeding years.

C Corporations and 401(k) Business Financing: What You Should Know


401(k) business financing (officially known as the Rollovers for Business Start-ups (ROBS) arrangement) is one of the less-often discussed, but nonetheless financially significant, advantages of the C corporation structure.

It is the only entity that supports this arrangement. Entrepreneurs can use their retirement funds as business financing without incurring tax penalties or early withdrawal fees if they use a ROBS plan to do so.

It is possible to implement this increasingly popular funding arrangement by taking the necessary steps to allow a pre-tax retirement account to essentially “invest” in a business.

This results in the 401(k) plan becoming a shareholder in the corporation, and the retirement funds being transferred to a plan hosted by the corporation.

Because C corporations are the only legal entities that permit the sale of stock ownership for cash, they are the only structures that are compatible with the ROBS structure.


When considering a ROBS structure for a recapitalization of an existing business, those considering changing from a pass-through entity, such as a limited liability company, to a C corp can do so in order to take advantage of this type of debt-free business financing.

Corporate Citizenship Is Beneficial for Small Businesses It is not a decision that entrepreneurs take lightly when it comes to choosing a corporate structure.

Owners of growing and evolving businesses may find themselves in the position of having to change the organizational structure.

The C corp model is not only appropriate for large multinational corporations; small businesses can benefit significantly benefits from potential small business tax deductions, and they may be able to completely avoid the effects of double taxation.

Always consult tax advice and be prepared to make adjustments to organizational strategies on a regular basis.

However, when considering the financial impact of taxes on a fledgling business enterprise, it may be well worth the effort to set up a C corporation that is beneficial to your business’s owners.

C Corp is Beneficial for Small Businesses

It is not a decision that entrepreneurs take lightly when it comes to choosing a corporate structure. Owners of growing and evolving businesses may find themselves in the position of having to change the organizational structure.

The C corp model is not only appropriate for large multinational corporations; small businesses can benefit significantly benefits from potential small business tax deductions, and they may be able to completely avoid the effects of double taxation.


Always consult tax advice and be prepared to make adjustments to organizational strategies on a regular basis.

However, when considering the financial impact of taxes on a fledgling business enterprise, it may be well worth the effort to set up a C corporation that is beneficial to your business’s owners.

No doubt there are lots of tax benefits of C-Corporations. But as mentioned above the foremost advantage of S-Corporation is you don’t need to pay taxes 2 times. you can easily avoid double taxation. But the downside is you have will not qualify for certain deductions.

Which type of business entity is best for you? Limited Liability Company, C-Corporation, or S-Corporation?

It is entirely dependent on the nature of your business and its requirements.

It is necessary to consult professional advice on which option is more appropriate for you and why.

We attempted to summarise the advantages of all three business structures: Limited Liability Company, C-Corporation, and S-Corporation.

It is entirely up to you to decide what is best for you.

Important Note

Please do consult your CPA/Financial Advisor/Legal Advisor before taking any decision by yourself. As they can guide you better as to which kind of business structure is best for your business and can provide you maximum tax benefits as well as other benefits.

You may also like our article and review of Business Insurance and general liability insurance provided by the great Hiscox.

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